Because we are researchers, we write better resumes

What you know that you don’t know that you know: Our training as researchers makes us better writers of resumes. Don’t forget the things that you know about people and about language, which may have become so natural over the course of study that you may have forgotten that you know them! So what makes […]

Series: What a linguist knows about the job search

Reading a Resume: The meaning of TYPOS Inspired by my student John Spangler’s “what you know that you didn’t know that you knew” definition of linguistics, I would like to spend some time today reflecting on resumes, considering what it is that we know about these cultural texts that we didn’t know we knew about […]

Facework and Deixis in Performance reviews

As job seekers, we have a tendency to focus on the interviews which lead up to the job offer (informational interviews, job interviews), but think little about what comes beyond.  One of the themes of this blog is to consider shifting our perspective such that we are putting ourselves into the day-to-day work mindset which […]

Intertextuality and Informational Interviewing: The what, how, and why

Q: What does Becker’s (1994) observation that “social groups seem to be bound primarily by a shared repertoire of prior texts” have to do with the job search (165)? A: A new way to approach Informational Interviewing. We know that when we sit down for an informational interview, it is important to ask our interviewee […]

Linguist, Know Thyself: Insights from your Academic Path or What You’ve Learned Thus Far

Begin by being reflective about yourself – Linguist, know thyself: Examine your own path with an eye to identifying patterns in the choices that you make and have made. In the way that you are trained as a sociolinguist to examine presuppositions, identify underlying assumptions and (often largely unsconscious) systematicity and patterning in your own […]