The changing resume as explored with the SPEAKING grid

In thinking through the changes that are happening to resumes (and the contexts in which this document is typically encountered), Hymes’ SPEAKING grid mnemonic provides a means for capturing and organizing some of the more salient developments. S – setting P – participants E – ends A – acts K – key I – instrumentalities …

Resume as a research paper

Resume: A revised, peer-reviewed process! There are many conceptual metaphors which are useful for thinking about a resume (and many excellent guides for working on resumes, and I encourage you to consult them freely. Some of my favorites are: Gallery of Best Resumes and No Nonsense Resumes).  But I am an academic, and the conceptual metaphor …

Pack your resume like a suitcase

I am often asked whether or not a resume needs to be one page long, and while yes, I personally do think that any resume you send to an employer should be no more than one page long, the goal is really that of being as smart as possible with a limited amount of space. …

Because we are researchers, we write better resumes

What you know that you don’t know that you know: Our training as researchers makes us better writers of resumes. Don’t forget the things that you know about people and about language, which may have become so natural over the course of study that you may have forgotten that you know them! So what makes …

Resume – the SPEAKING grid

As analysts of language, we are very aware that any text can serve as a portrait of identity, and there are few documents more critical in the presentation of selves over the course of our lives than our resumes (CVs). But how can we as sociolinguists bring what we know about language and how it …