Professional Identity: Learning how to talk the talk

One of the goals of the MLC program is to provide students with a set of analytical tools.  We provide the training in linguistic analysis that will be needed to be to be able to do a job upon graduation, but another primary aim is to help students cultivate a “voice” that helps them enact …

Talking about money

Yesterday, my Language and Society class watched John Gumperz’ Cross Talk I and II, which, because I am also now teaching the Proseminar made for an entirely different viewing experience.  I saw these interactions through a professional development lens, with an eye to what I can teach my students about what aspects of their own …

Because we are researchers, we write better resumes

What you know that you don’t know that you know: Our training as researchers makes us better writers of resumes. Don’t forget the things that you know about people and about language, which may have become so natural over the course of study that you may have forgotten that you know them! So what makes …

Series: What a linguist knows about the job search

Reading a Resume: The meaning of TYPOS Inspired by my student John Spangler’s “what you know that you didn’t know that you knew” definition of linguistics, I would like to spend some time today reflecting on resumes, considering what it is that we know about these cultural texts that we didn’t know we knew about …

Jan Blommaert and the career search?

Reading Blommaert today I am struck by the resonances with Doug Richardson’s talk to MLC students in the Proseminar last night. Specifically, he talks about 5 theoretical principles that underlie our research tradition as analysts of language. These also happen to resonate deeply with Doug’s observations about what social “work” takes place in the first …